“Liberal Arts Teaching Online in Zoom” Online Webinar: Tuesday, March 17 and Thursday, March 19

Join a live LACOL webinar and hands-on practice with five experienced liberal arts teachers from Swarthmore College, Vassar College, Williams College, and Washington and Lee University.  This team regularly collaborates to deliver online/hybrid classes for the liberal arts.

Many liberal arts colleges are asking faculty to consider how they may temporarily move their teaching online as part of emergency preparedness in the face of COVID-19 or other disruptions to regular classroom teaching.  Tips and guides are circulating, and faculty get lots of support from their local IT and teaching and learning centers.

This interactive Zoom session will highlight five liberal arts colleagues (including our very own Moataz Khalifa, Assistant Professor and Director of Data Education, and Assistant Professor of Biology, Natalia Toporikova!) to explore the ways they’ve learned to teach effectively online while maintaining a liberal arts approach that emphasizes personal interactions and critical thinking. Bring your ideas and questions!

Webinar Hosts
Webinar Hosts

Two live sessions: 

  • Tuesday, March 17, 2020 – 1:00pm-2:00pm EST
  • Thursday, March 19, 2020 – 11:00am-12:00pm EST

Recordings will be shared afterwards.

Webinar Agenda:

  • Min 00 – 10: Welcome and Self-Introductions
    • Learning goals for this session
    • A little background about the LACOL summer online class
  • Min 10 – 35: Hands-on practice in Zoom 
    • Encouraging Student Participation
    • Sharing Screens / Remote Screen Control
    • Using the Chat panel for conversations
    • Breakouts – great for small group work and discussion
  • Min 35 – 45: Group reflections on keeping a liberal arts approach online that emphasizes personal interactions and critical thinking
  • Min 45 – 55: Open Discussion / Q&A

Sign Up: https://forms.gle/HxRbWe5cvMubcZzA7 
Additional Resources: http://bit.ly/lacol-teach-online

WSJ: “No Place to Hide: Colleges Track Students, Everywhere”

Two bullet surveillance cameras attached on wall. Photo by Scott Webb on Unsplash.
Two bullet surveillance cameras attached on wall. Photo by Scott Webb on Unsplash.

Is tracking college students everywhere they go on campus the new normal? According to this recent Wall Street Journal article by Doug Belkin,  “Universities are recording students’ faces with video surveillance cameras, tracking their movements with GPS and monitoring their messages on social media and email. They are detailing students’ study habits through digital textbooks, recording when they enter buildings, logging their presence in class, the library and even the football game. All of these relatively new tracking technologies are in addition to years-old systems that leverage students’ IDs to monitor how frequently individuals are entering gyms, dorms and cafeterias.

Before you even have to ask, ITS can openly assure all students, faculty, and staff that absolutely no monitoring or surveillance of any kind takes place here at Washington and Lee currently and never will.

Protecting the University’s systems and information assets is tantamount to safeguarding the personal information of students and employees. And privacy isn’t just about compliance; we also respect your privacy on a humanitarian and ethical level.

Learn more about W&L’s information security plan (ISP). It’s something we take very seriously.

LinkedIn Learning: Coronavirus and Learners Working From Home – Suggested Courses

person using gray laptop. Photo by Mimi Thian on Unsplash.

Due to the current situation regarding the coronavirus outbreak, many organizations are taking precautions regarding the health and safety of their employees.  LinkedIn Learning has recommended topics related to successfully managing change and working remotely. 

Here’s a list of LinkedIn Learning courses (you must sign in with your W&L credentials) you can leverage to help in this admittedly crazy climate if you are impacted:

Need help accessing LinkedIn Learning? Contact the ITS Information Desk at 540.458.4357 (HELP) or email help@wlu.edu.

Keep Calm and Wash Your Hands

Resources from Stephen Lind’s “Designing and Assessing Presentation Assignments”

Our second Pedagogy and (not) Pizza session, “Designing and Assessing Presentation Assignments” was led by Stephen Lind, Assistant Professor of Business Administration and author of “A Charlie Brown Religion: Exploring the Spiritual Life and Work of Charles M. Schulz“.

a person trying to communicate to another person but the message is jumbled upWe want our students to have effective communication skills, but, truthfully, designing and assessing these activities in class can be incredibly challenging. So, we want to again offer our heartfelt thanks to Stephen for sharing essential questions and criteria to consider when designing unique speaking assignments, a turn-key model that faculty can build on, and an assessment tool to give student feedback.

Lastly, in case you missed it, here’s a link to all of the super helpful workshop materials (must sign in with W&L credentials) in Box.

Is there a topic or issue you’d like CARPE and Academic Technologies to address in Pedagogy and (not) Pizza? Let us know

When’s the Last Time You Cleaned Your Keyboard and Mouse? 🤔

“Yay, it’s flu season!”

—No one, ever

Sanitize your keyboard and evict that nasty grime and bacteria – stat!

https://www.totaljobs.com/insidejob/workplace-hygiene-6-office-germ-hotspots/
Ewwwww, right???

Using disinfectant wipes to clean your keyboard and mouse — along with other measures like keeping your distance from sick people and thoroughly washing your hands before eating and after using the toilet — can help to prevent the spread of colds and flu.

Protect yourself and do your part to help prevent the spread of any viruses!

Keep an eye out for packs of disinfectant wipes in classrooms. Over Feb Break, we took the liberty of wiping down keyboards and mice and are making wipes available so you can continue to sanitize these devices before you use them.

Recap of the POGIL Training Seminar

POGIL is an acronym for Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning.

As a student-centered instructional approach, in a POGIL classroom, students work in small groups/teams on specially designed activities that follow a learning cycle paradigm of exploration, concept invention, and application, with the instructor acting as a facilitator.

Developed in Chemistry before expanding to fields throughout the disciplines, the POGIL approach has two broad aims: to develop content mastery through student construction of their own understanding, and to develop and improve important process skills such as information processing, communication, critical thinking, problem solving and metacognition and assessment.

Matt Tuchler and Gail Webster

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Gail Webster, Professor and Chair of Chemistry at Guilford College, and our very own Matt Tuchler, Associate Professor of Chemistry, acted as the facilitators, leading us though the organization of a POGIL course, how guided inquiry is structured in a POGIL classroom, several POGIL activities, as well as considerations for classroom facilitation.

Attendees who experienced a POGIL-based learning environment included faculty and staff members from Accounting, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Cognitive and Behavioral Science, Computer Science, ITS, Journalism and Mass Communications, Physics and Engineering, and the University Library. 

Many thanks to both Gail and Matt, and all who took the time to attend. We’re always thrilled to offer provide training in new teaching pedagogies and even more elated when faculty are interested and willing to learn to use these methods.

BONUS: Find the Enhancing Learning by Improving Process Skills in STEM (ELIPSS) rubrics helpful? We did, too! View and/or download all the rubrics.

  • CT = Critical Thinking
  • IC = Interpersonal Communication
  • IP = Information Processing
  • MC = Metacognition
  • MG = Management
  • PS = Problem Solving
  • WC = Written Communication
  • TW = Teamwork 

The files with “feedback” in the title — CT, IC, IP, TW — are those with suggestions for improvement. This new style is not available for all rubrics yet.

Interested in future pedagogy workshops? Sign up for the Academic Technologies once-per-term newsletter or reach out to Julie Knudson, Director of Academic Technologies, or Paul Hanstedt, Director of the Center for Academic Resources and Pedagogical Excellence (CARPE).

Announcing Canvas Academy, April 13-16, 2020!

Folks, the clock is ticking and the retirement of Sakai is creeping closer and closer …

For anyone who needs to learn the ins and outs of Canvas, Academic Technologies is offering a week-long opportunity to get up to speed with W&L’s learning management system: a special edition of Spring Academy focused entirely on Canvas.

We will offer the same 3 sessions each day at different times, so hopefully, you will be able to join us. All sessions meet in Parmly 302, but feel free to bring your laptop.

Questions? Contact Brandon Bucy (bucyb@wlu.edu or x8651) or Helen MacDermott (hmacdermott@wlu.edu or x4561).

Save the Date!

Spring Term Festival poster - May 22, 2020

Friday, May 22
12:00-2:00 pm, Main Level of Leyburn Library

Tell us what you’ll need to showcase your students’ hard work over this intense 4 week term. The Request for Technology form is now available.

We will do our very best to honor all requests. Kindly note that there is a limited number of locations for projectors and projector screens, as well as easels and poster boards, so please complete the form as soon as possible. Thank you!

Questions? Contact hmacdermott@wlu.edu, 540.458.4561.