Be a Part of the 2020 Active Learning Fellows Initiative (ALFI) Cohort!

Active Learning Fellows Initiative logo of yellow lightbulb

We are now accepting applications for the 2020 ALFI Cohort.

If you’re ready to incorporate active learning in the classroom and interested in examining and making thoughtful adjustments to your teaching methodology with a group of like-minded colleagues and the gentle guidance of ITS Academic Technologies, then you should apply! 

Professors selected to participate will receive a stipend of $1,000 and must be able to meet the following requirements:

  1. As part of the cohort, you agree to read and discuss the recommended articles and chapters on active learning prior to meetings.
  2. You will incorporate active learning elements into a Fall 2020 course. (You should have taught the course at least twice  previously so that the content is very familiar.)
  3. You will identify at least one module in the course that can be reworked using active learning techniques.
  4. You will attend up to four meetings over the summer (late May through early August) with Academic Technologies and CARPE staff and/or other cohort members to work through the process of planning and building the active learning module, and one meeting in the fall to discuss progress.  If you’re planning on being away/abroad for most of the summer, this program may not be for you.
  5. You will provide feedback to Academic Technologies on what worked, what needs improvement, and give suggestions on how to improve the program in the future.
  6. You agree to participate in a Fall or Winter Academy panel session on active learning, sharing results of the program.
  7. You will participate in future ALFI cohort meetings/luncheons, when new participants are ready to discuss how to rework modules, and other sessions, when available.

Ready? Set? Go! Visit go.wlu.edu/alfi to apply now!

Update from Classroom Technologies: Classrooms and Learning Spaces That Got a Facelift!

Classroom Technologies has been super busy this past spring and summer making modifications and upgrades to classrooms and spaces around campus.

  • Ruscio Center for Global Learning 123 – Two new 80” flat panel displays!
  • Early Fielding Conference RoomSolstice Pod and 65” flat panel display!
  • Huntley Hall 323 – New touch panel, Solstice Pod for wireless connectivity, new Blu-ray player, new laser projector!
  • Sydney Lewis Hall Classrooms A, B, C and D – New light controls!
  • Sydney Lewis Hall Classroom B – Digital switching upgrade along with new touch panel, new ADA-compliant lectern. Solstice Pod for wireless connectivity, Blu-ray player, front camera and ceiling mics for videoconferencing, new dual laser projector, and new screens!
  • Sydney Lewis Hall Classrooms E and G – New touch panel screen, new ADA-compliant lectern! Solstice Pod for wireless connectivity, Blu-ray player, front camera and ceiling microphones for videoconferencing, and dual flat panel displays!
  • Stackhouse TheaterNew assisted listening system, new surround sound system, new screen, new rear camera for lecture capture, new front camera and ceiling mics for videoconferencing, new touch panel screen in control booth, along with the ability to control resident PC and monitor event audio! 
  • Wilson Hall 2017 – New touch panel screen, Solstice Pod for wireless connectivity, Blu-ray player, front camera and ceiling mics for videoconferencing, new laser projector, and a new larger screen!
  • Wilson Hall 2020 – New touch panel screen, Solstice Pod for wireless connectivity, new amplifier and speakers, new laser projector, and new screen!

Hats off to Tom Capito, Alicia Shires, Todd Goetz, and Andy Briggs for all the amazing work you’ve done with these updates!

If you have any questions about the technology upgrades, please contact the ITS Information Desk at 540.458.4357 (HELP) or email help@wlu.edu.

Submit your Winter Academy session proposals! 

Winter Academy 2019 will run from Monday, December 9 through Thursday, December 12.

If you have an idea for a session, please email Julie Knudson and/or Helen MacDermott and tell us the following:

  1. Title
  2. Description
  3. Presenter(s)
  4. Presentation format: Panel, guest speaker, workshop, information session,  discussion, demonstration (you can select more than one)
  5. Duration
  6. Preferred day(s)/time(s)/location
  7. Technology required 
  8. University account number (if you’d like to have the session catered)

Thanks! Registration will open in late November/early December at go.wlu.edu/winteracademy.

The NY Times nailed it: “Why You Need a Password Manager. Yes, You.”

graphic of computer monitor with key in front of it
Everyone should use a password manager. It’s the most important thing you can do — alongside two-factor authentication — to keep your data safe.

You probably know that it’s not a good idea to use “password” as a password, or your pet’s name, or your birthday. But the worst thing you can do with your passwords — and something that more than 50 percent of people are doing, according to a recent Virginia Tech study — is to reuse the same ones across multiple sites. If even one of those accounts is compromised in a data breach, it doesn’t matter how strong your password is — hackers can easily use it to get into your other accounts.

But even though I should know better, up until a few months ago I was still reusing the same dozen or so passwords across all of my everything (though at least I had turned on two-factor authentication where I could). It’s just too difficult to come up with (and remember) unique, strong passwords for dozens of sites. That’s why, after much cajoling from co-workers, I started using a password manager — and it’s why you should be using one, too. Aside from using two-factor authentication and keeping your operating system and Web browser up-to-date, it’s the most important thing you can do to protect yourself online.

Hear, hear! Read more at https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/27/smarter-living/wirecutter/why-you-need-a-password-manager-yes-you.html or go download LastPass Free straight away!

Lecture Capture with YuJa

W&L is transitioning from Tegrity to YuJa, an all-in-one service for recording, editing, storing and streaming multi-formatted video and audio content, including screen capture, across any device. (This transition is taking place because McGraw-Hill is discontinuing Tegrity.)

In addition to lecture capture, YuJa (pronounced “you-jah”) can be used for video management, live streaming, video conferencing and creating video quizzes. YuJa offers the same major features as Tegrity, but with additional flexibility and capabilities, and can be used from within the classroom or from a personal computer or mobile device.

It is available to all faculty, staff, and students and is integrated with Canvas

Looking for the YuJa Recording Nuts and Bolts Handout that Brandon distributed at the Fall Academy sessions, “New and Improved! Lecture Capture with YuJa”? Look no further!

Contact the ITS Information Desk at help@wlu.edu or 540.458.4357 or Senior Academic Technologist Brandon Bucy if you have any questions about using YuJa or lecture capture in the classroom!

Want to have your students blog or create a website in your Fall term course?

Excellent! ITS Academic Technologies applauds you.

Blogs can be spaces for informal or formal writing by students, and the capacity of blogs to support multiple forms of media (images, videos, links, etc.) can help students bring creativity to their communication.

Creating a website as a project allows students to interface with information in new ways, and can teach them relevant skills, such as website design, information literacy, and writing for a broader audience.

Contact Helen MacDermott (hmacdermott@wlu.edu, 540.458.4561) if you’d like to have an academic WordPress site set up for your class. I can also come to your class to give students a 15 minute tutorial on how to blog or create pages within WordPress.

How to create a more equitable classroom and improve learning for all

Teaching inclusively requires faculty to reflect intentionally on the decisions they make in their course that affect who is not being included or heard. Our goal is to have the faculty we work with embrace the idea that the inherent diversity of their students is not a problem, and acknowledge that a lack of structure in both course design and classroom environment hurts students unequally. We then provide some practical, easy-to-use tools to empower faculty to make their courses more inclusive.
 
— Viji Sathy and Kelly Hogan
 
Viji Sathy and Kelly HoganKelly Hogan and Viji Sathy are both award winning instructors with a combined 25+ years in the classroom at the University of North Carolina. They are passionate about student success, equity, and inclusion in the classroom. They have expertise on inclusive techniques and active learning in any size crowd, because both teach courses routinely with hundreds of students. On their campus, they lead innovative classroom and diversity administrative initiatives that benefit all students, faculty, and staff. Both are leading the campus in curriculum reforms, bringing course-based undergraduate research experiences and makerspace courses to all disciplines. 
 
Did you know Drs. Sathy and Hogan will be speaking at Fall Academy? This is a great opportunity to reflect on inequities and diversity in your classroom through interactive, hands-on activities. After providing a framework for inclusive design and their own research results, participants will be led through active learning exercises and case studies that explore inclusive techniques.
 
Sign up for “Leveraging Technology to Cultivate an Inclusive Classroom” on Friday, August 23, 2019 at 12:00 PM in Hillel 101 at go.wlu.edu/fallacademy.
 
 

There’s only ONE first day of class …

The first day of class is a once-in-a-semester opportunity to, well, set the stage for a great semester!

So what’s on your agenda?

Do you plan to create an open friendly classroom environment? Hope to handle administrative matters? Set course expectations and standards?group of hands giving the "thumbs up" gesture

Here are some resources you may find helpful to prepare for this all-important day:

If you’re unfamiliar with the technology in your classroom or just need a refresher, contact help@wlu.edu to request a classroom orientation. We’ve got you.

Please Welcome Canvas to W&L!

stork carrying a "baby bundle" with the Canvas logo

Woo-hoo! Canvas is Live!

You may now access the Canvas Learning Management System at https://canvas.wlu.edu.  Fall 2019 courses have been imported and are available for you to begin building out.  

During the 2019-20 school year, both Canvas and Sakai will be available, and you are free to use either platform until the end of Spring 2020 when Sakai will be retired. However, professors who wish to use lecture capture as part of their classes will need to use Canvas in order to do so.  Tegrity has been discontinued by their parent company, McGraw Hill, and we are employing a new lecture capture software called YuJa, which is available only through Canvas.

In preparation for the upcoming school year, Academic Technologies will be conducting numerous Canvas training sessions.  We have daily Canvas sessions scheduled for faculty during Fall Academy (August 19-30, 2019), and are also offering a 3-day workshop called Camp Canvas (August 13-15, 2019).  Participants in this workshop will leave with a thorough understanding of the new LMS and a Canvas course ready to go for the 2019-2020 academic year.  Additional training opportunities will be provided the week of August 5-9 for Law School faculty. As always, Academic Technologies staff will also be available at any time for one-on-one faculty training, migration requests, and support sessions.  Please contact Brandon or Helen directly (bucyb@wlu.edu or x8651; hmacdermott@wlu.edu or x4561) or via help@wlu.edu to ask any Canvas questions or to request personal training.

To view further details about the transition timeline, upcoming events, and migration/training resources, please visit our Canvas website at https://canvas.academic.wlu.edu

Many thanks, and welcome to Canvas!