“Artificial Intelligence in the Courts” on Thursday, February 15 at 1:00 PM

A robot is sitting at a judge's bench. The text reads, Artificial Intelligence in the Courts, Professor Sarah Cravens. Discussing what lawyers should know about how judges incorporate Al themselves, what they expect from lawyers, and what is on the horizon. Are the robot judges coming? How are recent advances in artificial intelligence tools having an impact in the work of courts in the US and abroad? February 15, 1-2 PM, Moot Court Room, Sydney Lewis Hall, Snacks Provided.

Are the robot judges coming?! 

How are recent advances in artificial intelligence tools having an impact in the work of courts in the US and abroad?

These developments promise improved efficiency and the potential to enhance access to justice, both at individual and systemic levels, but with that potential comes a measure of risk and uncertainty.

Sarah Cravens, Visiting Professor of Law, and  Joshua Fairfield, William D. Bain Family Professor of Law, will explore the upsides and ask whether existing ethics rules are sufficient to cover the issues raised by current use of generative AI by judges (and lawyers) in U.S. courts. They will also discuss what lawyers should know about how judges incorporate AI themselves, what they expect from lawyers, and what is on the horizon.

Thursday, February 15, 2024
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Lewis Hall, Moot Court Room

Join us in person or watch via the livestream link.

Free Webinar! “Academic Integrity in the Age of AI”

Higher Learning: How to boost academic integrity in the age of AI. Headshot of James Lang and the Top Hat logo.
 
Dr. James Lang, educator and author of Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty, will share course design practices that improve student learning while reducing the incentives to cheat.
 
Dr. Lang posits that the root of academic dishonesty often lies in the pressures embedded within the educational system itself. These pressures inadvertently push students towards cheating. What’s compelling is that the strategies to counteract cheating are not just about enforcing stricter rules. Instead, they align closely with principles that cognitive theorists advocate for enhancing student engagement and learning.
 
This approach is not just theoretical. It’s backed by Dr. Lang’s extensive research and experience in education. By rethinking course design and teaching strategies, educators can significantly reduce the incentives and opportunities for students to cheat.
 
This FREE webinar on Thursday, February 1st at 2 pm EST will go over:
 
  • The common course design practices that lead to academic dishonesty
  • Teaching strategies that reduce the incentive and opportunity to cheat
  • How low stakes assessments build confidence and lead to better study decisions
  • The role transparency and motivation play in promoting academic integrity

About the Speaker

James M. Lang, PhD, is the author of six books, including Distracted: Why Students Can’t Focus and What You Can Do About It and Small Teaching: Everyday Lessons from the Science of Learning. He also writes a monthly column on teaching and learning for The Chronicle of Higher Education. A dynamic and highly sought-after public speaker, Lang has delivered conference keynotes and workshops on teaching at more than a hundred colleges, universities, and high schools in the United States and abroad.

Register Now to learn strategies to motivate students and improve learning in the age of AI!

Explore generative AI with Academic Technologies: Announcing our “All in for AI” workshop series!

Effective ChatGPT Prompts -Thursday, Jan 18, 2024
Ethics and Biases of ChatGPT - Thursday, Feb 01, 2024
Image Creation with Adobe Firefly and DALL-E -Thursday, Mar 07, 2024
In the rapidly evolving landscape of technology, generative artificial intelligence stands out as a revolutionary force, reshaping how we interact, create, and think. 

Why Generative AI?

Generative AI, the technology behind tools like ChatGPT and DALL-E, is not just a buzzword; it’s a gateway to endless possibilities. From crafting detailed text responses to creating visually stunning graphics, generative AI is setting new benchmarks in creativity and efficiency.
 
This technology is becoming integral across various sectors, including education, business, and the arts. Thus, it’s crucial for faculty and staff to gain foundational knowledge and hands-on experience in this field so we also prepare our students.
 
  • Effective ChatGPT Prompts
    Thursday, Jan 18, 2024
  • Ethics and Biases of ChatGPT
    Thursday, Feb 01, 2024
  • Image Creation with Adobe Firefly and DALL-E
    Thursday, Mar 07, 2024
All sessions meet from 10-11 am and 2-3 pm in Leyburn 119. Sign up at go.wlu.edu/ai-workshops! Space is limited.
 

AI Workshop: Prompt Engineering for Academics – THIS Wednesday 10/18 at 12:00 PM

A promotional poster for an AI Workshop presented by Josh Fairfield. The subtitle reads "Prompt Engineering for Academics." The background features an array of advanced robots and machinery in white and silver colors against a pale backdrop.

Delve into the world of artificial intelligence with William Donald Bain Family Professor of Law Josh Fairfield at his upcoming workshop. Discover how AI can elevate your academic pursuits and gain insights into navigating the ethical landscape of this technology.

  • 📅 Date: Wednesday, Oct 18
  • ⏰ Time: Noon
  • 🔗 Join: Zoom Link

Harness the power of AI and propel your scholarship to new heights.
Don’t miss out!

Free AAC&U Webinar about the AI’s impact on the workforce and higher education!

The AI Revolution: Transforming Higher Education for the Workforce of Tomorrow

Wednesday, September 13, 2023  at 2:00 p.m. ET.

While much of the discussion surrounding higher education and artificial intelligence (AI) has focused on scaling up AI research and adapting teaching methods in the face of tools such as ChatGPT, another side to AI’s impact on higher education is also compelling action. AI and machine learning are reshaping the world of work. It is predicted that over the next five years, new career paths will emerge, many existing paths will be reshaped, and some will end because of AI adoption and innovation. Higher education has entered a pivotal moment of challenge and opportunity to respond to this rapidly changing employability landscape.

This webinar will feature a panel of experts who will contemplate the impact AI will have on the near-term future of employment in the United States and consider the most important changes higher education can make to develop a well-prepared workforce. This discussion will also focus on partnership, curricular, and pedagogical opportunities that will enable higher education to prepare our students for an increasingly AI-rich future.

Register now!

Moderator

C. Edward Watson
Associate Vice President for Curricular and Pedagogical Innovation, Executive Director for Open Educational Resources and Digital Innovation, AAC&U

Panelists

Earl Buford
President, Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL)

Brian Haugabrook
Specialist Leader, Deloitte

William J. McKinney
Senior Fellow, AAC&U

Krystal Rawls
Workforce Integration Network Director, California State University, Dominguez Hills

FREE Webinar: Will AI Replace the Educator?

Will AI Replace the Educator?

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. ET, Thursday, August 10, 2023

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is rapidly transforming how students learn and even how educators teach. While we’re still in the early stages of realizing the vast potential of these new technologies, it doesn’t feel too soon to wonder, will AI replace teachers?

In this webinar, join esteemed professors David Lefevre and David Shrier from Imperial College Business School as they embark on an enlightening exploration of AI’s potential and its profound impact on the educational landscape.

Through their expertise and insights, you will gain a comprehensive understanding of the following topics:

  • Unlocking the potential: demystifying AI and its applications
  • Revolutionizing higher education: harnessing AI’s transformative power
  • From theory to practice: examining the current landscape of AI adoption in education
  • Navigating the future: exploring the impact of AI and automation in education

Register now! All registrants will be provided access to the webinar recording.

Save the Date! AI x Education Conference: Generating The Future of Education with AI

AI x Education Conference
Driven by Students, Dedicated to Educators
August 5-6. 2023
10 AM-4 PM (CDT)

There’s still time to register for a FREE online conference that aims to address pivotal topics surrounding artificial intelligence (AI) in education.

Scheduled to take place on Saturday, August 5 and Sunday, August 6, 2023, from 10 am-4 pm (CDT), the AI x Education Conference: Generating the Future of Education with AI, invites participation from K-12 and Higher Ed educators, AI specialists, leaders in EdTech, students, and parents, with no admission cost.

The conference will discuss the impact of AI on education, address current challenges and potentials, share their perspectives and experiences, and explore innovative solutions. A special emphasis will be placed on including students’ voices in the conversation, highlighting their unique experiences and insights as the primary beneficiaries of these educational transformations.

Kristen DiCerbo, Chief Learning Officer at Khan Academy will give the keynote address, ”Building AI Applications at Scale.” And Christopher Dede, a senior research fellow and the Timothy E. Wirth Professor in Learning Technologies at Harvard Graduate School of Education for 22 years, will give the plenary talk, “If AI is the Answer, What is the Question: Thinking about Learning and Vice Versa.”

Learn more about the AI x Education Conference and register now!

5 Text Prompts for ChatGPT that Professors Need to Try!

Dr. Ethan Mollick and Dr. Lilach Mollick are at it again! Their latest paper, Using AI to Implement Effective Teaching Strategies in Classrooms: Five Strategies, Including Prompts, is a FANTASTIC resource for instructors looking for guidance to integrate AI into their teaching practice.

No time to read it? Then check out Dr. Mollick’s summary of these approaches.

Don’t have time for that either? OK, then scroll down for *just* the prompts and examples that we tried.

Strategy 1: Examples created by AI

Prompt #1: “I would like you to act as an example generator for students. When confronted with new and complex concepts, adding many and varied examples helps students better understand those concepts. I would like you to ask what concept I would like examples of, and what level of students I am teaching. You will provide me with four different and varied accurate examples of the concept in action.”ChatGPT prompt (by Ethan Mollick): I would like you to act as an example generator for students. When confronted with new and complex concepts, adding many and varied examples helps students better understand those concepts. I would like you to ask what concept I would like examples of, and what level of students I am teaching. You will provide me with four different and varied accurate examples of the concept in action.

Strategy 2: Explanations created by AI

Prompt #2: “You generate clear, accurate examples for students of concepts. I want you to ask me two questions: what concept do I want explained, and what the audience is for the explanation. Provide a clear, multiple paragraph explanation of the concept using specific example and give me five analogies I can use to understand the concept in different ways.”ChatGPT prompt (by Ethan Mollick): You generate clear, accurate examples for students of concepts. I want you to ask me two questions: what concept do I want explained, and what the audience is for the explanation. Provide a clear, multiple paragraph explanation of the concept using specific example and give me five analogies I can use to understand the concept in different ways.

Strategy 3: Using AI to develop low-stakes tests

Prompt #3: “You are a quiz creator of highly diagnostic quizzes. You will make good low-stakes tests and diagnostics. You will then ask me two questions. (1) First, what, specifically, should the quiz test. (2) Second, for which audience is the quiz. Once you have my answers you will construct several multiple choice questions to quiz the audience on that topic. The questions should be highly relevant and go beyond just facts. Multiple choice questions should include plausible, competitive alternate responses and should not include an “all of the above option.” At the end of the quiz, you will provide an answer key and explain the right answer.”

ChatGPT prompt (by Ethan Mollick): You are a quiz creator of highly diagnostic quizzes. You will make good low-stakes tests and diagnostics. You will then ask me two questions. (1) First, what, specifically, should the quiz test. (2) Second, for which audience is the quiz. Once you have my answers you will construct several multiple choice questions to quiz the audience on that topic. The questions should be highly relevant and go beyond just facts. Multiple choice questions should include plausible, competitive alternate responses and should not include an "all of the above option." At the end of the quiz, you will provide an answer key and explain the right answer.

Strategy 4: Assessing what students know, and what they are confused by

Prompt #4: “I am a professor who wants to understand what students found most important about my class and what they are confused by. Review these responses and identify common themes and patterns in student responses. Summarize responses and list the 3 key points students found most important about the class and 3 areas of confusion: [Insert material here]”

For this example, you’ll need to have student input collected through a classroom assessment technique such as an exit ticket, 1-minute paper, or muddiest point activity. 

Strategy 5: Distributed practice with AI

Prompt #5: “You are an expert instructor who provides help with the concept of distributed practice. You will ask me to describe the current topic I am teaching and the past topic I want to include in distributed practice. You will also ask me the audience or grade level for the class. Then you will provide 5 ideas about how include the past topic into my current topic. You will also provide 3 questions I can ask the class to refresh their memory on the past topic.”

ChatGPT prompt (by Ethan Mollick): You are an expert teacher who provides help with the concept of distributed practice. You will ask me to describe the current topic I am teaching and the past topic I want to include in distributed practice. You will also ask me the audience or grade level for the class. Then you will provide 5 ideas about how include the past topic into my current topic. You will also provide 3 questions I can ask the class to refresh their memory on the past topic.

AI Content Detectors to (Potentially) Assist Identifying Whether Text is Human or AI-generated

The face of a female-appearing android overlaid with microchip pattern over random, color-coded source code in the background

Looking for help to detect texts or parts of a text generated by GPT-3 or GPT-2 or another artificial intelligence model?

[Note that it’s extremely difficult to definitively determine whether a language model was used to generate a piece of text, and no tool is guaranteed to be 100% effective. However, they could be potentially useful to help you identify potential instances of language model-generated text.]

That said, here’s a short and ever-growing list:

DetectGPT
 
GPTZeroX
 
CatchGPT
 
Writer AI Content Detector
 
AI Text Classifier
 
OpenAI’s GPT2 Output Detector
 

How do these tools detect AI-generated content?

These tools generally:

  • Look for common linguistic features or patterns in machine-generated text. AI-generated text, for example, may be more repetitive or have a reduced degree of complexity and variability compared to text written by a human.
  • Check for specific formatting or structural features that are common in machine-generated text. AI-generated text might have a more uniform structure or lack the variety of formatting styles that is typical of human-written text.
  • Check for certain keywords or phrases that are commonly used in AI-generated text. That’s a lot harder already. In general, there are statistically significant patterns known and detectable of which word combinations a model like GPT3.5 picks.
  • Compare the content with known examples of machine-generated text to determine the likelihood that it was generated by a machine.

There’s still time to sign up for tomorrow’s Technology and Tacos lunch-and-learn session: 

Gray human brain situated against a background with mathematical concepts on the left (logic) and a tangle of colorful swirling lines on the right (creativity) Tuesday, Jan 31 @ 12 PM | Leyburm 119. A good defense is the best offense and grounding your teaching in good pedagogical practice can help to ensure that ChatGPT's disruption of our students' learning is minimal. Join Dr. Paul Hanstedt, Director of the Harte Center for Teaching and Learning, for a discussion of effective practices in the age of AI. Sign up at go.wlu.edu/techandtacos.