Want to have your students blog or create a website in your Fall term course?

Excellent! ITS Academic Technologies applauds you.

Blogs can be spaces for informal or formal writing by students, and the capacity of blogs to support multiple forms of media (images, videos, links, etc.) can help students bring creativity to their communication.

Creating a website as a project allows students to interface with information in new ways, and can teach them relevant skills, such as website design, information literacy, and writing for a broader audience.

Contact Helen MacDermott (hmacdermott@wlu.edu, 540.458.4561) if you’d like to have an academic WordPress site set up for your class. I can also come to your class to give students a 15 minute tutorial on how to blog or create pages within WordPress.

How to create a more equitable classroom and improve learning for all

Teaching inclusively requires faculty to reflect intentionally on the decisions they make in their course that affect who is not being included or heard. Our goal is to have the faculty we work with embrace the idea that the inherent diversity of their students is not a problem, and acknowledge that a lack of structure in both course design and classroom environment hurts students unequally. We then provide some practical, easy-to-use tools to empower faculty to make their courses more inclusive.
 
— Viji Sathy and Kelly Hogan
 
Viji Sathy and Kelly HoganKelly Hogan and Viji Sathy are both award winning instructors with a combined 25+ years in the classroom at the University of North Carolina. They are passionate about student success, equity, and inclusion in the classroom. They have expertise on inclusive techniques and active learning in any size crowd, because both teach courses routinely with hundreds of students. On their campus, they lead innovative classroom and diversity administrative initiatives that benefit all students, faculty, and staff. Both are leading the campus in curriculum reforms, bringing course-based undergraduate research experiences and makerspace courses to all disciplines. 
 
Did you know Drs. Sathy and Hogan will be speaking at Fall Academy? This is a great opportunity to reflect on inequities and diversity in your classroom through interactive, hands-on activities. After providing a framework for inclusive design and their own research results, participants will be led through active learning exercises and case studies that explore inclusive techniques.
 
Sign up for “Leveraging Technology to Cultivate an Inclusive Classroom” on Friday, August 23, 2019 at 12:00 PM in Hillel 101 at go.wlu.edu/fallacademy.
 
 

There’s only ONE first day of class …

The first day of class is a once-in-a-semester opportunity to, well, set the stage for a great semester!

So what’s on your agenda?

Do you plan to create an open friendly classroom environment? Hope to handle administrative matters? Set course expectations and standards?group of hands giving the "thumbs up" gesture

Here are some resources you may find helpful to prepare for this all-important day:

If you’re unfamiliar with the technology in your classroom or just need a refresher, contact help@wlu.edu to request a classroom orientation. We’ve got you.

Registration for Fall Academy 2019 is now OPEN!

Fall Academy is two weeks — Monday, August 19 through Friday, August 30 — of technology instruction, pedagogy discussions, guest speakers, hands-on workshops, panels, and other information sessions for new and returning faculty and staff, offered in coordination with the University Registrar, Dean of the College, Office of the Provost, and other offices.

NEW for 2019: Inclusivity Day!

The first Friday of Fall Academy (August 23) will offer four very special sessions, all in Hillel House 101, including:

  • Inclusive Teaching and Mentoring, 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM;
  • Leveraging Technology to Cultivate an Inclusive Classroom, 12:00 – 1:30 PM;
  • Applied Inclusive Pedagogy: A Practical Guide, 2:00 – 3:00 PM; and
  • Disability, Diversity and Inclusivity: Pedagogy in Higher Education, 3:15 – 4:15 PM.

Sign up now at go.wlu.edu/fallacademy!

ATTENTION! WordPress Update on Monday, July 1st at 5:00 am EST!

We will be pushing the WordPress 5.2.2. update on Monday, July 1, 2019.

This maintenance release fixes 13 bugs — see https://wordpress.org/news/2019/06/wordpress-5-2-2-maintenance-release/) for more information. 

The update is scheduled for 5:00 am EST, with interruptions to the service potentially occurring for up to 1 hour.

***If you are working on an academic.wlu.edu site, please save all your work and log out before 5:00 am EST on Monday, July 1st.***

Contact the ITS Help Desk (540.458.4357 or help@wlu.edu) with any questions or concerns. 

Buh-bye, Lynda! Hello, LinkedIn Learning!

The upgrade to LinkedIn Learning is now complete! Your Lynda.com account — assuming you had one — has been upgraded and your data moved to Linkedin Learning.

Now, all you have to do is activate your account. There are two ways to do this!

#1: Click the activation link in the learner activation email you receive.

First: Activate your LinkedIn Learning account by clicking the link in the confirmation email you’ll receive once the upgrade is complete.

Second: Connect your LinkedIn account (optional) or create a separate Learning account.

Third: When you choose to connect your LinkedIn account,  you’ll be prompted to log into LinkedIn, or you can create a LinkedIn account if you don’t have one.

Fourth: Click accept to complete the process of connecting your LinkedIn account to your LinkedIn Learning account.

#2: Click activation link in learner experience on Lynda.com when are you signed in to Lynda.com.

If you didn’t have a Lynda account, you can still have access to LinkedIn Learning. Email Helen MacDermott to request an invite.

Need help? Contact the ITS Information Desk at help@wlu.edu or call 540.458.4357.

Upgrading Lynda to LinkedIn Learning

On Thursday, June 6, we will be upgrading Lynda to LinkedIn Learning. As such, Lynda will not be accessible on Thursday, June 6, as data is migrated over.

All account and course information will be transferred to LinkedIn Learning. Upgrading your Lynda account to LinkedIn Learning will require activation via an email from LinkedIn Learning that you will receive on June 7. You need to use a different link to access LinkedIn Learning, but you will still use your W&L credentials to log in.

If you have any questions, please contact the ITS Information Desk at help@wlu.edu or call 540.458.4357.

Visit this website for more information on upgrading to LinkedIn Learning  or watch this short video:

About LinkedIn Learning

LinkedIn Learning, which acquired Lynda, has the same great content, but provides an even more personalized experience. And, it’s still free for you to use!

With LinkedIn Learning, you’ll experience the same things you love about Lynda.com like:

  • High-quality content: At the core of LinkedIn Learning is high-quality Lynda.com content. If you have favorite content on Lynda.com, don’t worry, it is still there!
  • Comprehensive data and progress: Data, including groups, playlists, assigned content, account settings, and histories were automatically migrated.
  • Learner course video page: All of the features and functionality of this page remains the same. This includes transcripts, exercise files, mobile viewing, and bookmarking.

You’ll also experience many new and improved features including:

  • A new, easy-to-use interface
  • Personalized course recommendations
  • Social curation, and more

During the activation process, you will have the option to connect a LinkedIn account to your LinkedIn Learning account. (If you do not have a LinkedIn account, you will be able to create one.)

If you choose to connect your LinkedIn account, you can rest assured that only your learning data will be shared with your employer. No other data from your LinkedIn account will be accessible or shared.  See the details of the Privacy Information.

Learners who choose to opt out of connecting their LinkedIn account will create a separate LinkedIn Learning account that is not connected to LinkedIn.com.

Want a FREE copy of “Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning”?

“Learning is deeper and more durable when it’s effortful. Learning that’s easy is like writing in sand, here today and gone tomorrow.”

As educators, we love learning. We’ve devoted our professional lives to teaching and are committed to developing lifelong learners, yet … most students don’t know how to learn.

Written by storyteller Peter Brown and two cognitive scientists who have spent their careers studying learning and memory, Henry Roediger and Mark McDaniel, “Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning”, is an in-depth review of the most effective ways in which people learn (interleaving, retrieval practice) and a rebuke against widely used methods (re-reading, highlighting texts) that are not as effective.

In exchange for a free copy of the book, we ask that you read it over the summer and come to the Fall Academy luncheon on Friday, August 30 at 12:00 pm, ready to discuss the book. Sign up for Fall Academy begins on July 1.

In order to best facilitate a lively discussion, we are capping enrollment to fifteen, so please apply ASAP!

Questions? Contact Julie Knudson at jmknudson@wlu.edu.

10 active learning strategies that connect teachers with students

Poll Everywhere is a classroom response system that engages students on devices they already have: their phones. Educators create and embed live, interactive questions into their lectures, and students respond in real-time from the privacy of their phones. The results are immediate.

Poll Everywhere’s Maxwell McGee recently blogged about a few of the wonderful strategies teachers and professors alike have produced using interactive questioning. Each example actively engages students in the learning process, and includes a link for further exploration …

Use multiple-choice questions to kickstart classroom debates

Christopher Robertson helps his first-year law students at the University of Arizona understand the nuances of law with a technique called cascading persuasion. If too many students answer the question incorrectly, Robertson will not reveal the correct answer. Instead, he has each student turn to their neighbor and debate whose choice was correct. When the two reach a consensus, they find another pair of students and plead their case.

“Law students can easily go an entire semester passively attending class [only to] discover on the final exam that they have not grasped the concepts covered in class,” said Robertson. “I find that polling in class encourages active student participation and uncovers misunderstanding of how to apply the law.”

Eventually the entire class will agree on which answer is correct. Most of the time their consensus is correct, but on the rare occasion it’s not, Robertson says it’s an easy fix.

Law school example poll

Read more at https://blog.polleverywhere.com/active-learning-strategies/.

Want to try out Poll Everywhere? Great! Email Brandon Bucy or Helen MacDermott and we’ll get you set up!

The potential perils of screen sharing at work!

Check out this unintentionally hilarious and totally helpful piece in the NY Times , “How to Not Ruin Your Life (or Just Die of Embarrassment) With a Screen Share“:

Whether it’s happened to you or in front of you, many of us are familiar with the screen-share disaster: the accidental exposure of something private (like, say, a friend’s “I’m pooping at work” text) while projecting your screen before a group of colleagues.

The only surefire way to avoid this is to do as the lawyers recommend and keep your personal things on your personal devices and your work things on you work computer. Sonia Farber, a partner and founder of Kluk Farber Law, acknowledges that may not be feasible for everyone. “But, to the extent that you can keep some separation of church and state, you should make every effort to do that,” she said.

Here’s a checklist of things to do before your next meeting.

Read more at https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/21/style/screen-share-privacy-tips.html!