WANTED: Your Winter Academy session proposals!

cute cartoon deer behind blue and white colored leaves and branches of holly against a snowy background

Mark your calendars! The 2022 Winter Academy will take place during Exam Week on Monday, December 12 through Thursday, December 15. 

Winter Academy is just as awesome as Fall Academy — full of panel discussions, pedagogy workshops, technology tutorials, information sessions, guest speakers, and more, all specifically designed to support your success as a teacher, scholar, and mentor at W&L — but, alas, shorter in duration.

If you have an idea for a session, please visit go.wlu.edu/wa-request and complete the form. (Completion of the form does not guarantee your proposal will be accepted.)  Requests will be considered in the order in which they are submitted. 

You will be asked for:

  • Session title
  • Session description
  • Presenter(s) name and department
  • Session type
  • If you’d care to offer catering
  • Session duration
  • Preferred days and times from Monday, December 12 – Thursday, December 15

Thank you! Registration will open in late November/early December at go.wlu.edu/winteracademy.

Questions? Email Julie Knudson (jmknudson@wlu.edu) or Helen MacDermott (hmacdermott@wlu.edu).

How do I share a YuJa video with another W&L user?

Sharing your YuJa content with a direct link is a great way to allow other W&L users to view your video. Whether it’s a classroom lecture, tutorial, or Zoom meeting that you need share, here’s how you go about it:

1. Go to myapps.wlu.edu and type in your W&L credentials. Click on the YuJa tile.

2. Hover over the media you would like to share.

3. Click on More… to open the Media Details pane:
Hovering over the desired YuJa video

4. Click on the Links tab:
clicking on the Links tab in the Media Details pane of a YuJa video

5. Click the Copy to Clipboard button next to the Direct Link field.

6. Share the Direct Link with any user that you wish!

7. Pat yourself on the back!

Note that the default security setting is set to platform authentication which means that only those who can log in to YuJa with W&L credentials can view the shared video. If you need to share media with someone outside of W&L, on the Links tab,  click on the Security Settings button, uncheck Password or Authentication Restriction, and click the Save button.

The above steps also work if you have a folder of media you want to share! Hover over the folder, click on More…, then click on the Links tab.

Need help with or have questions about using Digication? Contact the ITS Information Desk at help@wlu.edu, 540.458.4357 (HELP), or stop by the ITS Information Desk, located on the Main Level of Leyburn Library.

Annnnndddd … that’s a wrap!

animated

Wow! That was a pretty incredible two weeks of professional development and delicious snacks and meals, no?

Thank you, thank you, thank you to everyone who presented (you rock!) and many, many thanks to everyone who made time during this very busy time of year to attend 60 different information sessions, tutorials, demonstrations, open houses, workshops, and panel discussions!

If you’ve not already done so, could you please fill out evaluations for any sessions that really stood out for you, for better or for worse? Go to https://go.wlu.edu/FallAcademy, and every past session should have a green Evaluate this Session button. We take your comments seriously and we consider all recommendations to improve our offerings. 

Though Fall Academy is over (sniff sniff), the learning and dialogue continues. The Harte Center and Academic Technologies is excited to partner with you to help amplify your teaching practice.

Come visit us on Level 1 of Leyburn Library. Our doors are always open. We are here to help.

How to print your own copy of the 2022 Fall Academy schedule

You can always find the latest and greatest version of the Fall Academy schedule at go.wlu.edu/fallacademy, but for those of you who’d like a printed copy, these instructions are for you!

To print the Fall Academy schedule as a foldable booklet:
 
  1. Download the .PDF above.
  2. Open the .PDF in Adobe Acrobat DC.
  3. Choose File > Print and select the desired printer.
  4. Under Pages to Print, select All.
  5. Under Page Sizing & Handling:
    • Select Booklet.
    • Select Both sides for Booklet subset.
    • Select Left for Binding.
    • Select Portrait for Orientation.
  6. Click the Print button. If you’re a Mac user, your screen will look something like this:
    Print Setting options for Adobe Acrobat DC on a Mac to print the Fall Academy schedule as a booklet
  7. Fold in half and enjoy!

There’s still time to sign up for Fall Academy sessions, but space is filling up fast, so don’t delay!

NEW! Updates from Classroom Technologies in W&L Learning Spaces

Help Cards – We’ve made Quick Start guides for how to use the classroom systems. They will be placed in classrooms prior to the fall term. Be on the look out for them!

W&L Guest Account – We’ve also added stickers to classroom monitors or keyboards with login information for a Guest account, so it is there when you need it. We recommend only using the guest account for someone who doesn’t have a WLU account. This account will not retain any information once you log off or someone else logs on to the computer.

Help Button – The  Help button is now responsive to whether Classroom Technologies personnel are on campus, if it is after hours, or if W&L is closed.

When you press the Help button and someone is here, you will see “A staff member is on their way to assist you.”

AV Help Schedule screenshot from podium

If it’s after hours or the University is closed, you will get a message similar to “For after-hours support, contact the Help Desk at 540-458-4357 (help@wlu.edu) to see if someone is available.”

In either situation, there will be a ticket created and assigned to the instructor who is scheduled in the room at that time. The ticket will come from the ITS Help Desk  and will allow us to easily communicate and resolve any issues quickly.

To learn more,  join the Classroom Technologies team at our Fall Academy session, Classroom Technology Demo/Tips,  on August 25th at 10:30 am in Leyburn 119. Register online at go.wlu.edu/fallacademy.

Technology and Tacos is BACK this Fall!

Technology & Tacos - A Lunchtime Workshop Series focusing on the IQ Center

Who doesn’t love tacos? And what could be better than tacos prepared by Dining Services for lunch with ITS Academic Technologies while learning about how you can partner with the IQ Center?

Please join us in Science Addition 202A (IQ Center) on: 

  • Tuesday, September 20 from 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM for  “Spatial Reconstruction – LiDAR and Photogrammetry” with George Bent, The Sidney Gause Childress Professor of Art History; Owen Collins, Professor of Theater; and Chris Connors, William E. Pritchard III ’80 Professor of Geology
  • Tuesday, October 25 from  12:00 PM – 1:30 PM for “Imaging – Panoramas, Drones and Video!” with David Harbor, Professor of Geology, and Isra El-Beshir, Associate Director of Museums
  • Thursday, November 10 from  12:00 PM – 1:30 PM for “Virtually Amazing” with Sandy de Lissovoy, Assistant Professor of Art, and Gregg Whitworth, Associate Professor of Biology

Registration is now open for all THREE Technology and Tacos/Thai/Turkey session at go.wlu.edu/tech. Sign up now! Space is limited.

Welcome, NameCoach!

 

red "HELLO my name is" name badge with IMPORTANT filled inNames matter. Pronunciation matters. 

W&L has adopted a new tool that allows faculty and students to record the pronunciation of their names to aid others in saying it correctly and listen to the recorded names of others: NameCoach

How it works: Students voice-record their names and instructors can access this information within their Canvas courses. Faculty and staff can also voice-record their name and add a link to their email signatures.

Want to get started? Read these how-to guides: 

Also, Director of Academic Technologies, Julie Knudson, will be offering a session about NameCoach during Fall Academy on Thursday, August 25, at 1:30 pm in Leyburn 109. Sign up at https://go.wlu.edu/fallacademy.

Have questions about NameCoach? Need help? Contact the ITS Information Desk at 540.458.4357 (HELP), email help@wlu.edu, or stop by the ITS Information Desk on the Main Level of Leyburn Library. We’re here to help.

Registration for Fall Academy Opens TODAY!

Registration for Fall Academy is now open!

orange background with tan and orange leaves and yellow flowers, with a little squirrel holding an acorn
Woo hoo! This year, Fall Academy will take place from Monday, August 22 through Friday, September 2.

ITS Academic Technologies and the Harte Center for Teaching and Learning, in coordination with the Provost’s Office, Office of the Dean, and other offices, have curated a variety of panel discussions, pedagogy workshops, technology tutorials, information sessions, guest speakers, specifically designed to support your success as a teacher, scholar, and mentor at W&L.

Please visit go.wlu.edu/fallacademy to see the full schedule and to register for sessions that interest you. There’s something for EVERYONE — all W&L staff and faculty are invited and encouraged to attend.

P.S. If you’re interested in any catered sessions, registration will close 7 days prior to the session in order to give Dining Services an accurate headcount. Please sign up as soon possible once you know you’re able to attend. Thank you.

P.P.S.S. If you’re a presenter at a session that is being catered, PLEASE register if you’d care to dine. Thank you again.

“Strategies to Ensure Your Students Feel Heard” from The Faculty Lounge, brought to you by Harvard Business Publishing Education

cartoon female in red blouse with eyes closed, listening intently

Adapted from 6 Ways to Improve Your Listening Skills by Rebecca D. Minehart, assistant professor of anesthesia at Harvard Medical School; Benjamin B. Symon, faculty for the Debriefing Academy; and Laura K. Rock, assistant professor at Harvard Medical School

When our stressors increase, our executive functioning and cognitive flexibility are taxed, making it harder to give our students the full attention they deserve. We talk when we should listen. Prescribe solutions when we should ask for details. Lose the thread on conversations when we should be helping to find the focus.

The good news is, with practice, we can all be more effective listeners. Here’s how.

Determine your default listening style

Learning to listen well begins with understanding what type of listener you are. In our work, we’ve observed four distinct listening styles:

  • Analytical listeners analyze a problem from a neutral starting point. Example: You listen to two ExecEd students debate the relevance of a recent article to their industry, taking care to explore both students’ viewpoints before responding.
  • Relational listeners build connection and seek to understand the emotions underlying a message. Example: You notice a student’s voice quivers when they talk about an upcoming paper that’s due, so you consider whether they’re stressed and why.
  • Critical listeners judge both the content of the conversation and the reliability of the speaker themselves. Example: A student challenges you about a grade, so you listen to their reasoning to determine whether this is just about their GPA or whether it’s worth changing your viewpoint.
  • Task-focused listeners shape a conversation toward the efficient transfer of important information. Example: A student asking for a deadline extension attempts to offer a lengthy justification for the request, but you interrupt early to find out how long of an extension they’re seeking.

With these definitions and examples as a guide, ask yourself, Which style do I default to most?

Recognize when your default listening style is disruptive

Sometimes our usual listening style can sabotage our goals. Maybe you tend to use a task-focused or critical listening style so you can make rapid decisions. That’s great when there is time pressure, but it can backfire when a student needs more support.

Consider this scenario:

Student: “I don’t feel comfortable speaking in front of the class. Everyone judges me.”
Educator: “Of course no one is judging you! We all feel like that sometimes, but the best solution is to dive in and give it a try.”

Here, the student is displaying emotion, yet the educator is responding with a task-focused response, missing a valuable opportunity to acknowledge and explore what the student is expressing. The educator’s response is likely to make this student feel unheard and discouraged from sharing.

Recognizing this disconnect is a critical step in improving your listening skills.

Adapt your listening style to achieve mutual conversational goals

There are myriad reasons why we listen the way we do: to be efficient, to avoid conflict, to gain attention, to support, or simply to entertain. When those reasons are repeatedly (and perhaps unconsciously) prioritized, we shortchange other listening goals such as mutual understanding and greater connection.

If we can instead learn to shift dynamically between listening styles—by matching the speaker’s needs with the most appropriate listening technique—we may have more productive conversations.

Let’s go back to our example from above and instead use a relational listening style.

Student: “I don’t feel comfortable speaking in front of the class. Everyone judges me.”
Educator: “That’s a tough feeling to have. [Pause] Do you feel like talking about it?”

When a student expresses stress or fear, responding with validation and curiosity may allow you to capture valuable information and more effectively address the student’s needs.

Here’s another example scenario:

Student: “I’m scared about the midterm test.”
Educator: “I’m not planning on throwing any curveballs into the exam. But it’s normal to be nervous before a big test. [Pause.] What’s scaring you the most?”

What you learn from their response may change the way you approach that student’s learning in the future.

The impact of better listening

Experimenting with how we listen solidifies our active partnership in conversations. It expands the space for others to reveal what really matters to them and can allow us to get to the heart of the matter more deliberately. Through intentionally applying new ways to listen, we can build relationships, better understand others, and collaborate and problem-solve more effectively.